Republican Commissioner Dan Camp / submitted photo

Beaver County Commissioner Dan Camp is scheduled to fly to Washington, D.C., on Tuesday to testify in front of a House Congressional Energy & Commerce subcommittee.

Camp’s testimony will be given during a hearing of the committee titled, “Lessons from across the nation: State and local action to combat climate change.”

Others testifying will be Governor Jay Inslee of Washington, Mayor Steve Benjamin of Columbia, South Carolina, Mayor Jackie Biskupski of Salt Lake City, Utah, Mayor James Brainard of Carmel, Indiana, and Mayor Jerry Morales of Midland, Texas.

Although Camp is testifying in his official capacity as Beaver County Chairman, Commissioners Sandie Egley and Tony Amadio were not informed until this afternoon that he had scheduled travel to D.C. on official business.

Congressional Democrats have described the purpose of the hearing as an effort to understand “how state and local leaders are responding to the climate crisis in the wake of President Trump’s intent to withdraw from the Paris Climate Agreement.”

Camp, a Republican, was invited to testify by fellow Republican minority members of the committee who are in favor of President Trump’s withdrawal from the climate change accord. He prepared his written testimony with the help of Chief County Solicitor Garen Fedeles, but did not give copies of his remarks to his fellow commissioners for review.

BeaverCountian.com has obtained a copy of Camp’s prepared testimony as provided in advance to Congressional staffers, and is publishing it below as written.

Camp’s testimony speaks extensively of investments in the county by Shell Chemical, which has issued public statements in strong support of the Paris Climate Agreement.

House Committee on Energy and Commerce’s Subcommittee on Environment and Climate Change

Lessons from Across the Nation: State and Local Action to Combat Climate Change

Testimony of Daniel C. Camp III

Thank you Chairman Tonko, Ranking Member Shimkus, and Members of the subcommittee for inviting me to speak on behalf of Beaver County Pennsylvania. It is an honor to be here in front of you today. My name is Daniel Camp, and I am the chairman of the Beaver County Board of Commissioners. Of the 67 counties in the great Commonwealth of Pennsylvania, I am currently the youngest county chairman, and I sit on the Natural Gas Task Force Committee for the County Commissioner Association of Pennsylvania.

About 25 miles northwest of Pittsburgh, Beaver County Pennsylvania sits alongside the most northern part of the Ohio River and has approximately 168,000 residents. Throughout most of the 20th century Beaver County and its steel mills laid the foundation for the United States and the world. We designed, manufactured, and produced steel used in bridges, sky lines, and icons throughout our great nation.

Beaver County rode a wave of economic growth throughout most of the 20th century. In the 1980’s, however, our good fortune came tumbling down. American steel turned its back on Beaver County; mills shut down and unemployment peaked, but, we persevered. We knew we had a foundation for a great restoration, and today energy drives our economy. With an investment measured in the billions, we partnered with an engine that will fuel the nation. In Beaver County we are proud of our past, but we are also confident in
our energy future.

The current energy boom in Beaver County started with the Marcellus Shale. Approximately 10 years ago, Beaver County started to see the effects of technological advancements that made developing the Marcellus Shale possible. In addition to the billions of dollars in bonus and royalty payments to Pennsylvanians who leased their property for natural gas extraction, in 2012, the Pennsylvania General Assembly imposed a special tax on the industry, an “impact fee,” which is paid annually by unconventional natural gas producers for each well drilled. In its 2018 report, Beaver County received approximately $500,000 from this impact fee, which was an increase of about $160,000 over the prior year. In addition, the County’s 54 municipalities received a combined $618,000, nearly double the amount of the year before. All told, between allocations to the county, municipalities and impact fee-funded project grants, Beaver County has received $5 million for use in public infrastructure improvements, emergency preparedness and response, environmental protection, social services, parks and green spaces and tax reduction.

In 2016, Shell Chemical Appalachia announced it would build a petrochemical complex in Beaver County that would use low-cost ethane being produced in the Marcellus and Utica formations to produce 3.5 billion pounds of polyethylene per year, creating a foundation for regional manufacturing — pharmaceutical, industrial chemical, and plastic. Indeed, from life-saving medication and medical equipment to the cells phones we use every day, plastics sourced in plays like the Marcellus enhance our quality of life and make our modern world possible.

Shell’s decision to build this complex in Beaver County was a major coup for not only Beaver County, but the entire region. At its peak, 6,000 construction jobs will be necessary to build the complex, and once operational, it will support approximately 600 permanent jobs. While a definite opening date has not been made public, the anticipation is it will be operational within the next 2-3 years.

The construction of this complex has been a major boon for Beaver County. There are currently 3,700 workers on site, and the impact on our regional skilled labor workforce has been incredible. The site currently supports hundreds of electricians, pipefitters, ironworkers, carpenters, laborers, equipment operators, and other craftsmen. Many of these workers travel from out of the area to work at the site and have therefore spurred the hotel industry in Beaver County. We now have 33 hotels within the County, many of which were built as a direct result of the influx of these workers who now spend their entertainment dollars locally, eat at local establishments, and otherwise have helped to revitalize local businesses.

Infrastructure has also improved in and around the construction site. New roads and repaving of existing roads are directly attributable to the cracker plant. An improved interchange with Interstate 376 was built to handle the additional traffic in the area. Additionally, a new water intake system was built for a local municipality because the plant was to be built where their water intake system was previously located.

Once the plant is operational, we anticipate additional growth in the manufacturing sector as our region becomes attractive for companies seeking to locate in close proximity to the abundant supply of polyethylene produced here in Beaver County. In turn, we hope to see expansion in the professional services that support it as well (e.g. engineering, architecture, etc.).

Beaver County has tremendous potential, and that potential stems in large part from the economic opportunity the Marcellus Shale presents. Without a doubt, our modern world is built on energy, and our future hinges on our ability to leverage our domestic energy resources to fuel our economy, grow manufacturing, employ America’s labor workforce and continue to propel our country forward as a global leader. I am proud to represent a county that is integral to making this future possible. As you deliberate policy changes, I’m here to ask you to consider the monumental impact American shale gas development has had on our country and support this economic driver as vital to our shared future.

In closing, I want to thank you for the opportunity you have given me to come before you and speak today.

John Paul
John Paul is the founder of the Beaver Countian. He reports full-time for the site, specializing in investigative journalism with an emphasis on public corruption.

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jagbgh
Member
jagbgh

Please tell me this is an April Fool’s Joke….

Disgruntled
Member
Disgruntled

I’m going to need to re-read his testimony because I missed the part where he talks about the climate crisis in this climate crisis debate.

So my tax dollars are going to send a completely unqualified Daniel ‘college-drop-out’ Camp III to DC to deliver a completely irrelevant piece of testimony to a congressional subcommittee where he doesn’t even answer the question? Good stuff.

Mikko Meyers
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Mikko Meyers

Climate change , spare me! Support POTUS’s decision on pulling out of the Paris accord! Go Trump! MAGA! MBCGA!

Accordingtome
Member
Accordingtome

@Mikko Are you an idiot all of the time, or just when you get on the internet?

wind
Member
wind

Disgruntled, I thought I’d lost my comprehension skills when I had to read it twice to find anything regarding the climate crisis.

Disgruntled
Member
Disgruntled

I seriously hope after Dan delivers his monologue (written for him) that the subcommittee tries to engage him in actual dialogue to try to find out his thoughts on the Paris Agreement (which he didn’t address). The unions want us out of the Paris Agreement, Shell wants us in it. That puts Dan in a difficult position. My prediction? He flails around with his 6th grade mastery of the English language until the subcommittee dismisses him out of mercy and he doesn’t provide any opinion either way. Reaffirming that this entire trip was in fact nothing but an ego trip, literally.

Icanread
Guest
Icanread

Did Shell write that? Sounds like they did. I don’t care if he goes and gives his personal opinions, except it sounds like taxpayers are paying for it since it’s “official business.” Plus, where has that $5 million gone? Seems like the trucks wreck the roads, and all they get is a patch. I see no improvements to parks or green spaces (where has that happened). At the very least if they are going to claim some positive environmental impact, Shell could pick up all the litter at that exit since most of it’s construction related waste. The Paris Accord was a crappy agreement, but I bet if you ask Camp he would have no idea what it even said. I hope someone at the hearing asks specific questions. That would be hi-lar-i-ous!

Silence Dogood
Guest
Silence Dogood

Obviously an attempt by Camp to establish his relevancy in the part. Sadly he’s a babbling fool or ill informed on most matters.

WTF2:
Guest
WTF2:

Danny Boy Camp. Beaver Counties AOC. This should be epic!
There is no conclusive evidence that humans have caused global warming. It is the hoax of the century, and it makes a lot of people a lot of grant money. It also makes a convenient excuse for putting a global governor on capitalism to make the world fair for dictators and socialist welfare states, and make the looters very rich. Every claim of settled science the warmists make is based on computer models that do not work. The approaching Solar Minimum and it’s impact on humans IS settled science but the warmists ignore it.

Accordingtome
Member
Accordingtome

Congrats, you’ve won this week’s award for the comment based the most on total and complete ignorance. We usually only hand these out when Sylvia graces us with her presence but you are a special kind of stupid.

And yes, the award is settled science.

WTF2:
Guest
WTF2:

Being you’re a moron…George David will appreciate your vote for him for Sheriff.

Truthful
Guest
Truthful

This guy has a 3rd grade education, right? “Cells phones” – what is that?

And 20” century”? That means 20 inch century….!

But worst of all, he extols the virtues of the impact tax- like a typical tax and spend Democrat!