Investigative Report: IRS Revokes Hero Program’s Nonprofit Status

heroes4heroes

The Internal Revenue Service has revoked the nonprofit status of “The Hero Program,” a charitable organization in Beaver County dedicated to raising money for the families of significantly ill children.

The Hero Program was founded in 2009 by Steven Wetzel, the former varsity baseball coach for Freedom High School. Wetzel started the nonprofit in memory of John Challis, a player on his team who tragically died from cancer at the young age of 18. The organization sought to raise funds to provide for the everyday practicalities of families with ill children — Vehicle donations and gas cards so parents could get back and forth from hospitals, medical furniture to make children as comfortable as possible at home, holiday photo-shoots to capture memories for a time when that is all which remains.

A trendy website, accompanied by heart-wrenching photos and videos of terminally ill children with their desperate parents, demanded a call to action from the community. The good people of Beaver County responded en masse.

Dozens of police officers and firemen answered Wetzel’s pleas, holding pizza eating competitions and other events to bankroll his worthy cause. Police officers from Aliquippa, Beaver, Beaver Falls, Bridgewater, and Patterson police departments, along with the Beaver County Detectives, Assistant District Attorneys, Juvenile Probation Officers, Sheriff’s Deputies, and Beaver County Jail Guards, all raised money for the Hero Program. So did firemen from Aliquippa, Beaver Falls, Monaca, Patterson, East Rochester, Rochester, and Shippingport.

“We are honored to have these local heroes who risk their lives for us daily come along side these children whose lives are also at risk every day,” Wetzel told the Beaver Countian in an interview back in 2011. The organization’s name stood just as much for those who helped to raise funds, as for the struggling children who so critically needed them.

The plights of children the Hero Program raised money for were detailed publicly on social media, the heartbreaking last moments of young lives tweeted for the world to see and respond to.

While local emergency services personnel were Wetzel’s first responders, they were soon joined by organizations like the Penguins, Pirates, and the Steelers, along with large corporations like PNC Bank and Giant Eagle.

Golf outings, poker tournaments, marathons, and charity meal nights at local restaurants soon followed.

Among the Hero Program’s biggest cheerleaders was State Representative Jim Christiana. “There’s a family that I lived close to that I knew in Beaver for a while,” Christiana told the Beaver Countian. “The Hero Program had helped their daughter and grandchild some, that’s how I first became introduced to the organization.”

Christiana acted as M.C. at a pizza eating competition, ran in the marathons, played cards in the tournaments, served as a charity bartender, and helped at the Christmas drives. His name helped to add credibility to Wetzel and Canavesi’s fundraising efforts. “I was a proud participant,” said Christiana, “but it’s important to note that I never sat on their board, and had nothing to do with running the charity.”

What many didn’t realize about the organization, was that the Hero Program wasn’t a nonprofit of its own. Steve Wetzel had started the effort as a subsidiary of a Brighton Township based nonprofit called “The Frontline Initiative.” That organization, also established in 2009, was founded by Wetzel’s good friend Brooks Canavesi. The two had been close for years, both graduating from Blackhawk High School and Penn State University.

Then a full-time Financial Advisor with his family-based team, The Canavesi / York Group in Beaver, Brooks was the logical choice to handle the business aspects of the nonprofits. It was Brooks Canavesi who established the legal entity, and it was Canavesi who filed the appropriate paperwork with the IRS which entitled them to collect funds as a public charity.

Like Wetzel, Brooks Canavesi received great attention and accolades for his philanthropic efforts. In 2011, he was nominated for the prestigious Jefferson Award for charitable work and leadership within the community, and just last year he was named a grant recipient of the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation.

Along with the Hero Program, the Frontline Initiative is also the umbrella organization for “Poison Free,” Canavesi’s program to build self-esteem in young people facing substance abuse problems. That organization was named not-for-profit Business of the Year in 2009 by the Beaver County Chamber of Commerce.

While it is clear Wetzel and Canavesi have been able to raise considerable funds from the community, what turns out to be far more difficult to discern is where all of that money is going.

After receiving an anonymous tip in April of last year from an individual claiming to be a concerned family member of a child supported by the Hero Program, the Beaver Countian began to investigate the organization’s finances. Information about the organization’s spending on needy children proved to be sparse.

Public nonprofits are required by law to submit annual reports to the IRS detailing the contributions they received and their spending. An examination of the Frontline Initiative’s initial filing from 2009 showed they raised a total of $56,097 for the year.

Steven Wetzel did not answer specific questions about his organization’s finances, but did engage in a vague exchange with the Beaver Countian via email. “We are group of caring loving people that help terminally ill children as volunteers,” he wrote. “Just want to help kids that’s it.”

But the 2009 filing by Frontline Initiative shows it paid out salaries of $5,000 to Steven Wetzel that year to serve as the group’s Treasurer, and $11,270 to Brooks Canavesi to serve as its Executive Director. Roughly 30% of the total contributions their organization received its first year of operation went into their own pockets.

Frontline Initiative also declared $26,886 in “professional fees and other payments to independent contractors” in 2009. While that line item is designed to disclose overhead expenditures nonprofits make on items like accounting, auditing, attorney fees, and fundraising services for its organization, Wetzel insisted it reflected monies that went to the children it sponsors. “That’s rent, food, medical bills, gas to get to the hospital, their car repairs, home repairs, gas, electric, clothes, treatments that they need, medical equipment etc,” wrote Wetzel.

Only $1,400 was listed in Frontline Initiative’s 2009 return as going directly to grants and program services “for the benefit of sick children as they progress through their medical process.”

The organization finished its first year of operation with just $3,361 remaining in the bank.

frontline-990n

Following an exchange with the Beaver Countian via Twitter last May, Steven Wetzel said that things had “gotten better” since their initial report, and promised to forward along the organization’s filings from 2010, 2011, and 2012. Wetzel later deleted his messages on Twitter and changed the name of his account… the financial reports never came.

Exactly how much the Frontline Intitiative has raised since 2009, how much Canavesi and Wetzel have been paid by their organization over the years, and how much the nonprofit has actually given to terminally ill children, all still remain a mystery. The IRS reports the initial filing in 2009 was the last year they received a return from the nonprofit, and that the organization had subsequently failed to file any of its mandated financial statements with the federal government.

In May of last year, the IRS finally revoked Frontline Initiative’s nonprofit status (and the Hero Program’s along with it) for failure to comply with their filing mandates for 3 consecutive years. GuideStar, an organization which tracks nonprofits nationwide, now lists the Frontline Initiative as an organization of which “Further investigation and due diligence is warranted.”

A call made to the IRS today confirmed Frontline Initiative (and the Hero Program) were still categorized as a revoked nonprofit, there is still no record of any returns since 2009. The organization has not been legally permitted to accept tax deductible donations for months.

Even with their nonprofit status revoked for the past 9 months, the fundraising efforts of Steve Wetzel and Brooks Canavesi have been unwavering. They had an event this past weekend at Bocktown in Monaca, and their 5th Annual Charity Poker Tournament and Sports Memorabilia Auction is scheduled for March at The Club at Shadow Lakes. That tournament requires donations of $500 to The Hero Program to participate.

“I did not know that they had not been filing their statements,” Representative Christiana told the Beaver Countian. “I am very disappointed. Clearly, some questions need to be answered as related to the last few years of their operation. They need to disclose their revenues and expenses. The families of the ill children and donors who gave to them need an explanation.” Christiana added that he hoped Frontline Initiative and the Hero Program would now file the missing reports with the IRS.

Mel Mikulich of Monaca, who acts as the accountant for Frontline Initiative and the Hero Program, insists that the organization has filed all of the appropriate returns with the Internal Revenue Service for the past four years. “Those returns were filed, they were filed on time, and they were sent to the right address,” Mikulich told the Beaver Countian when reached by phone. “We got a letter in August stating there was a revocation [...] that was just about the time the IRS was running roughshod with every nonprofit that ever existed. Why they don’t have the files I do not know.”

When asked why the missing returns, which spanned 3 years, weren’t simply refiled when Frontline Initiative learned about the problems last August, Mikulich said he was afraid of confusing the IRS. “If the IRS can convince me that they don’t have them, then we’ll refile them. If we sent them a second one now we’d blow up their computer system, that’s just the way it works.”

When the Beaver Countian once again requested its own copies of the returns this week, which are a matter of public record because the organization is a charity, Mikulich said professional standards forbid him as an accountant from releasing them. Steven Wetzel sent the Beaver Countian an email a short time later, saying if he received a written and signed request mailed to his post office box, he would mail back a copy of the returns. When asked if the records could simply be sent via email or fax to avoid lengthy delays, Wetzel once again stressed his organization was run by volunteers, and that he could not fulfill any requests on short notice.

Steven Wetzel will be honored as a “Hometown Hero” by KDKA for his administration of the Hero Program at an event hosted by Larry Richert on March 6th at the Lexus Club at PNC Park.

A message left this week for Brooks Canavesi at a number listed on the Frontline Initiative’s website was not returned. The Beaver Countian will mail a signed request for financial records through the US Postal Service to Steven Wetzel’s post office box this week.

“We will continue to help terminally ill children and their families,” concluded Wetzel.

View Frontline Initiative’s Complete 2009 Return Here

Update 1/22/2014 @ 4:20am Frontline Initiative Inc. released a summary 2013 Profit & Loss statement for The Hero Program late last night in response to this report. Returns have not been posted for the missing years as of the time of this update. The summary P&L was accompanied by the following statement made by the organization, “2012 and 2013 are the first two years that Hero Program has operated by itself under the Frontline Initiative. In previous years the Hero Program operated in conjunction with Poison Free which had employees and operated as a training and community development organization.”

 

56 comments

  1. oh my did the sheriff have anything to do with this

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  2. isn’t looking good for some, and it’s sad simply put this looks like a created charity to create a job for one and subsidize income for another and a politician that got publicity and accountant that was clueless and some felt hey the crumbs we give children looks good and makes us feel good where not doing wrong hell we get awards for it.

    Very sad and I think a lot of people where tricked by some in this and the challis foundation understood and corrected its problem a while back. Which has no connection to this scam.

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  3. Obviously this is about a mixup over filing paperwork to the IRS . John Paul please get a life and follow up on all the real twisted shit going on in this county . If anyone knows the individuals that volunteer all their time to help these poor kids would agree this is how the Beaver Countian thrives for attention !!!!

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  4. There are a whole lot of people who will be expecting some sort of explanation…..and if things are as bad as they are sounding, these people have drug a lot of good people and organizations through some dirt. The repercussions could be immense. And it’s a shame that families in their most dire times with their loved ones, were seemingly being taken advantage of.

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  5. Yep he created a job for himself and got lost making contacts of athletes and trying to gain on them his own power

    Look a jock strap sniffer in his late thirties, recovering dope head looking to profit and just a band aid of money that could of went to these children.

    Feel bad for the law enforcement that got screwed in this, not to mention the victims that gave I could of have 30 bucks to the kids and saved 70 .

    What a joke and a shame, guess selling steroids to baseball players in high school want profit enough.

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    • Wait...What???

      those are pretty hefty allegations.  There is at least some fiscal irresponsibility going on here.  Don’t get me wrong on the surface it appears to be criminal what these guys were doing.  If that is proven to be the case they should be punished to the full extent of the law.  Dope head and steroid seller to children?  That sounds like libel to me.

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  6. @ get a life, even if there was a Mix up with paper work ummmm explain the last tax filing that’s what the same is correct all that money and throw crumbs at the poor kids

    I say thank you to this guy for writing and making people aware of the sham and it gives us a break from sheriff.

    To think this outfit has raked in corporate donors galore since that last filing. You see this shit in msnbc ect American greed

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  7. Hopefully everything will get straightened out – I’m sure the powers that be will bring in Rob Pratte for some Beaver County good ol’ boy damage control before the big awards shindig.  

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  8. Could this be the IRS targeting organizations associated with conservatives?

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    • I don’t know about the IRS targeting these folks, but they most certainly are targeting conservative or traditional organizations.  Obama takes his enemies lists to the extreme.  Right now he has the largest Veterans group in the nation in his sites, the American Legion.  The Legion is composed of all war time Vets.  It is disgusting what he is doing. 

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    • Betsy, they didn’t file paperwork for 4 years.  They have no one to blame but themselves.  

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  9. Financial reports will be on site soon. The facts are so far off.

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  10. We help kids and this online paper tries to prevent us from doing it with assumptions.

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    • SpeakTheTruthToo

      From what I’ve seen over the past few years I’ve been reading articles on this site, JP does not publish articles until he does all of his homework. Nice try scammer. You got caught.

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      • SpeakTheTruthToo: Very true. There is no hidden motive in the article here. Wait one or two weeks until this all shakes out, and the research will likely stand on its own. It’s an unfortunate discovery, but the subject is covered very well. If there is documentation that people can provide to counter the information, let’s hope they do it in a timely manner, but it appears as though the mistakes have already been made.

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  11. I know first hand how much you do for the families and I suggest the owner of this site talk to them and their relatives to get the full story and not forming assumptions.

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  12. Why were no families interviewed? If reporting the facts is what was truly being done here then answer that question.

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    • That’s a fair question.  This story was about the IRS revoking the nonprofit’s tax exempt status, and their ability to collect tax deductible donations along with it.The stories of the families supported by the Hero Program are heart-wrenching, and there’s no doubt support was provided to them.  There has been a lot of media coverage about the work this charity does.But the stories of their sponsored families are anecdotal.  Individuals helped by a charity can not know the entire financial picture of that organization, how much money was taken in by it, and where all of that money was spent.  Those are the issues this article sought to address.

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  13. @ rich

    I agree good has come from this charity but clearly more could of….

    Which I for one have donated to it at Texas road house attended Texas hold em ect

    I’m appalled at the ratio of giving and taking

    And now certain things make sense that wasn’t as clear before I’ve heard through some police and fire concerns of pizza eating contest that questions where raised I got one defended it but grew concerned in recent year. My wife and I have choose ti donate directly to the families

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  14. BeaverVolunteer

    You cannot look at an organizations return and make these types of allegations.  It ridiculous.  If John Paul took a little more time, he would of understood that Frontline Initiative had two divisions operating in much different ways.  The Hero Program raising money for families and Poison Free who trained at-risk youth and did community development like urban gardening.  The returns are the entire organization, not just the Hero Program.  Poison Free had employees and raised funds through selling websites and providing professional services.  All above board and tremendous services to the commmunity.  It’s sad the sensationalism is trying to derail a great organization and one that I’m proud to volunteer for.

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  15. These forms (l think it’s form 409) must be filed annually. If the organization misses consecutive years, it’s status is revoked. Frankly, It’s rather easy to forget about this requirement. More info. can be found in Harrisburg where charities must register.  Also, there are several organizations that assess charities and have internet sites.

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  16. concerned but objective

    I think there is a lot of assumption here. I have assisted with several charities and fund raisers. One thing people on the outside rarely understand is the cost involved. The cost of fuel for all the leg work and preparation alone can be stagering these days. I know that people donate and expect every dollar to go to the cause but sometimes that isn’t being realistic. There are meetings and luncheons and a lot of behind the scene things that are not taken into account. People who donate the time to do this should not be expected to incure the costs involved. Lets compare charities to the government “charities” and see who does more good and is more efficient. I will not pass judgment on this organization until all the facts are in. I will admit that I know a few people who do donate their time to this organization and do put in a lot of time and miles to do so. I think we should reserve judgement until this program has the opportunity to defend itself. And ask yourself what are you personally doing for charity. Get involved and you will soon have a very different perspective.

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  17. Anyone can type up and print a profit and loss statement,  this summary 2013 Profit

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  18. I love how so many people go into “shoot the messenger” mode.  JP is reporting the facts, not his opinion.  If you don’t like the facts, oh well.  Frankly, as someone who gave to this charity, I’m a bit pissed that they let things get so bad, paperwork wise, that the IRS pulled their status.  They have no one to blame but themselves.  For Steve W. to come on here and try to justify his actions is ridiculous.  It’s been 4 freaking years.  WTF have you guys been doing for 4 years that would preclude you from filing the necessary forms?  BTW, fire your accountant!  His excuses are laughable.  

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  19. SpeakTheTruthToo

    This reminds me of the PA Cyber School scam!

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  20. Went to the Frontline web site to learn more and found that it hasn’t been updated since 2010!!!  Something smells fishy!  Are they still in operation?

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  21. OK, it seems that these guys, who are not professional non profit administrators, have somehow gotten caught in the switches with the complexity of fund accounting and 501c3 corporations.I’m inclined to give them a chance to clear this up.  Having had my own unpleasant dealings with government bureaucrats and revenuers, i certainly wouldn’t lend much weight to what the IRS does or doesn’t do in terms of accessing the credibility of the non profits officers. I find it completely credible that the groups accountant does not want to resubmit the forms to the IRS.  To do so would be a tacit admission that the returns were not submitted in the first place (it’s flawed logic, but entirely consistent with how the IRS operates).  It’s also entirely likely that there’s no verifiable mailing record of these forms being submitted.  Business and charitible returns are typically been sent to a Cincinatti lock box, and the IRS being the IRS, won’t sign for even if they are sent certified, registered, etc. It also doesn’t surprise me that there’d be confusion on exactly how to apply disbursements, particularly if the accountant does not specialize in fund accounting.  I know just enough about fund accounting to know the most of the rules that apply to a for profit accrual based system don’t apply with fund accounting.  In all likelihood, these guys used their previous experience filing business tax returns and have found out that the expertise is not transferable.  Unfortunately, when dealing with the government, it’s far more important to appear to be following the law than to actually comply with the letter and intent of the law.  

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    • Forget the IRS for a second Eddie.  Are we to understand you disagree with G.A.A.P., FASB and the basic concept of consistently applied accounting and finance methods?  If so then this “youngin” is more than happy not learning from any of your experience.

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  22. I think it’s interesting that everyone with something negative to say hides behind their clever screen names. The people who have a clue what they are talking about, or have experienced something positive firsthand actually leave their names. :)

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  23. To suggest that Brooks Canavesi, a member of the Canavesi / York Group in Beaver, somehow got confused by “…getting caught up in the (IRS law) switches…” and is not a financial professional capable of negotiating the not-for-profit laws is ridiculous. The family is comprised of knowledgeable professional financial advisors and has been for a long time. I am only surprized that his father, Harry, or another family member did not see this coming and did not advise Brooks about it.

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  24. Sounds like the person who wrote this has a personal vendetta against Steve Wetzel, Brooks Canavasi and Jim Christani.

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  25. This is an opportunity for the charity to show transparency and account for their finances. This story does not need to generate emotional responses and its questions can be answered with the requested IRS documents. That should satisfy the detractors and supporters of H4H. This is the Information Age and these sort of questions need answered when charities lose their non-profit status. No big deal. The author points out the emotional impact that H4H has had, but the question is all of the charitable funds are spent. Seems like a fair request.

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  26. As one of the Hero families and a mother of not one, but two children diagnosed with a terminal syndrome, it saddens me to see anyone attack an organization which has helped my family and children in many ways. These individuals give up time in their lives to show love and support to us families who face extreme medical bills and stress.

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    • Danielle, no organization is being attacked here. At issue is the expectation that the help be provided honestly, openly and legally. If funds are collected, channeled and used properly, even more assistance to those in need would be possible. 

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  27. @ who ever

    Take notice half of proceeds dint make it to charity, that’s sad..

    Worse the accountant stated that they have been notified revocation of the charity so they should be still collecting until all is figured out

    Hardly looks like a vendetta against anyone, maybe mister wetzel shouldn’t of avoided questions months ago. I for one volunteered and donated with so much going bad in society you have to watch, and I’m glad this site investigated, I still have more questions.

    I agree with Jim Christiana they need to answer questions more than just why you haven’t filed or if you did but where the hell is all the cash going

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  28. Plus what was submitted isn’t anything but a profit and loss statement that can be done on quick books, wipe my ass with that.

    Not saying families didn’t benefit I personally know of a few, it’s just heart wrenching wondering how many could of if funds where not milked, for other cost and salaries

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  29. I’ve. Gave to Hero Program and will do in future
    The. IRS is the worst thieving thing this country has and if they don’t get what they want they just steal your hard earned property
    So who is doin good

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    • good to see you engaged in this discussion steve.  The youngins just assume that everything the government does is for some greater good.  i wish the experiences we have had were transferrable to those who think they know.

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      • Your hubris is overwhelming.  I think the youngins (that is not a word) have grown up in a generation where they demand transparency.  That includes transparency in our government and also our charitable organizations.  I didn’t see anyone on this thread claiming the IRS was an unstoppable force of justice.  This article has lead people to ask for a fair accounting of H4H’s financial records.  Seems fair enough.

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  30. I don’t think JP’s initiative was to take a moral inventory of Wetzel and Canavesi or the Hero Program. JP followed the money and rightfully so. 2.5 billion dollars were raised by several non profit organizations for Haiti Earthquake victims of 2010 but 94% of those monies didn’t go to the Haitians but went into deep pockets of the administration of the non profits. With a local nonprofit such as the Hero Program, I’d think the good people who gave of their time, their wallets, and let’s face it, their trust would want to see monies going to the children and families.  

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  31. Raven, respectfully your starting with the notion that the irs actually cares about applying the reporting rules fairly.  they care about keeping themselves employed, and the career bureaucrats that populate it existsolely to harass small business owners like Mr. canavasi. a i would encourage you to consider that those of us who have actually dealt with that horrible agency might have a perspective worth thinking about.  There is nothing that educates a liberal faster than having the government you think is there to help you totally screw you over.

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    • @eddiemerchant : You are inferring things that I did not say, mean or suggest. My family has maintained some investments through the Canavesi firm for more than 15 years, and it has become obvious that they know IRS tax law, and, they counsel investors about tax liabilities and obligations, up front. The point is that I find it unlikely but disturbing, unfortunately, that the proper IRS forms would not have been filed by Brooks or his business colleagues and/or that the apparent non-filing  was just an oversight. Maybe it was “intentional forgetting” or procrastination, to give them the benefit of doubt.  Brooks is not/was not the entire firm, and the other members of the firm might not have even known about the financial matters reported upon here. Actually, I doubt that they did. Regardless, if these matters here are true, I have serious doubts about continuing with the firm, even if they have/had   nothing or little to do with this matter. I certainly would not go back to Brooks, but the larger issue of credibility of the firm is something that must be addressed. I am sitting on rollover funds, and I shall wait until these matters are resolved before I invest them. There is great potential for collateral damage in many areas as this entire matter is being resolved, and this is just one that happens to be personal. 

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  32. John Paul has nothing better to do with his life than put other people down. Get a real job not one you created for yourself. Karma is a bitch and u will see that one day.

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    • @wow, Wow!! since when is reporting on any agency – whether government, profit, or nonprofit that refuses to be transparent of monies a bad thing? Sorry if you enjoy living in a bubble, but most of us; out in the real world, find JP’s reporting a breath of fresh air in Beaver County. Of course, liars and cheaters would put JP and his reporting down. They’re use to never having to be accountable “if you know the right people”.

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  33. Never ceases to amaze me some people in Beaver County continue to defend wrong doings if it involves their cronies. All the Beaver Countian did is report on the non profit org. Frontline Initiative, ” Hero Program’s” lack of reporting filings with the IRS. The Beaver Countian didn’t revoke the Hero Program’s non profit status the IRS did. It would seem logical if the Hero Program’s operation were on the up and up, they would have filed their mandated (by law) statements with the IRS. If this were the case and a three year lapse in fillings weren’t the subject at hand, 42 comments appearing on the Beaver Countian about the Hero Program loosing it’s non profit status wouldn’t exist. Instead of rallying friends to comment threats of Karma etc. at JP, why don’t you rally around the idea if Frontline Initiative doesn’t like bad press then perhaps do what is expected of a non profit organization that answers to their public by staying legitimate. Surely if this is a reputable organization that is supported by the ideals of care and commitment to families with ill children, the founders of this operation would make every effort to keep their non profit status to continue to support their cause. Right? 

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  34. Who cares if they filed the reports now,I dint I care that most of the money went to salary and operation cost of themselves and now wave a flag, WE HELP KIDS , no shit but these guys could of triple helped.

    Few zeros,, recruiting hero’s, to help hero’s

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  35. Just file the proper paperwork showing where the money went and STFU with the attacks on JP.

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  36. It’s been 5 days since a new story was posted, It must be time to make up a story about the sheriff

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    • That’s the nature of investigative journalism, avi. It takes time and effort — a HUGE amount of time and effort. This tax status revocation article is “over-the-top” in depth and quality, even for John Paul, and one of his best, regardless of the controversial content, for it demanded exceptional accuracy. I do not doubt that after “giving birth” to this article, he deserves a break. If you are “bored”, go to the Discussion forum and write something of your own. I have, and it contributes to this publication, whether it is positively received or not. 

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  37. I do my homework too John Paul and your a total quack. You have been playing journalist since the 90s. All anyone has to do is google him to find countless reviews on how awful he is and how he constantly bases his literature off personal issues of his own. I have no clue why anyone even cares what he says. He’s gained some popularity attacking two of the most well respected men in the county. Has anyone seen a picture if this guy? He’s a txt book nerd for those of you who enjoy stereotyping people. It also seems as though his goon use are one in the same. Fighting each other over grammar and punctuation. He needs to stop hiding behind his computer trying to bully people. Go out in public John Paul get some sun, find a chick desperate enuf to blow ya. This is txt book stuff right here just your typical looser who got bullied all his life using the power of the Internet to hide and let out personal angst. Put away the computer and get a real job this isn’t your calling.

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    • Ok, Googling expertise aside (of which you obviously have none), who are the “two most well respected men in the county? We all know what he looks like, his picture has been published often, due to the case that he is involved in with the sheriff. Also, if you were so proficient in the use of Google, you would know that he has a partner. No chick needed. You sound so horribly bitter about something, Sheepboy. What could it be? If this is what he chooses to do, who the fuck are you to berate him for it? He seems to be doing just fine with the path he’s chosen, what about you?

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  38. Raven, you say no organization is being attacked here? Ummmm that’s all that’s going on here you qwack! Omg lol

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    • Well, Sheep Slayer, make your mind up. Quack or qwack?  It’s been awhile since I’ve seen an such idiotic attack. You have some very obvious real ignorance issues, none of which is worth addressing here. Instead of slaying sheep, look into your own sacred cows, those who are above scrutiny and are demanding of so much of your worship and money. I would imagine, though, that even your definition of hero worship does not include stealing, falsifying and exploiting under false pretenses. In the very least, this reveals crass administrative incompetence, and your efforts should not be to further it. Done right, the benefactors would see real rewards, not apologies for misdeeds. The children are the heroes, not the program administrators. Get your priorities straight. 

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